Matt Butler

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Motörhead changed my life. Then the Ramones did. And Guitar Wolf. Public Image Ltd probably did as well. Then there was NoFX… and Henry Rollins. And Kyuss. Maybe even Monolord.

Come to think of it, Elvis and the Beach Boys probably changed my life as well, as I listened to them as a child (thanks mum and dad) and still harbour a desire for the former artist’s leathers and the latters’ garish Aloha shirts.

All right, I will admit it: every new thing I hear gives me something – even if it is just nausea. And it is this that keeps me looking. One day I might even find something as life-changing as Ace of Spades was all those moons ago.

Even  if I don’t, the exploring is still fun.

Oh, almost forgot. I am a Kiwi, I like long walks (well, runs), socialising (whisky), good food (chocolate and pork scratchings) and cosy nights in (doom metal by candlelight). And I am a Pisces. In my day job I write about people in shorts.

Articles by Matt Butler

Wiegedood – De Doden Hebben Het Goed II

With a more aggressive, orthodox approach and a greater use of light and shade, Wiegedood produce an even better album than their stunning debut.

Santa’s Gauze (Crust-mass Special) – The Unicorn, London

There were no more than 50 in the room, but we witnessed something special.

1000mods – Repeated Exposure To…

There are more riffs and hooks in the first song alone to fill an entire album. Put simply, it sounds huge, fuzzy, warm and crisp. Awesome stuff.

Raspail – Dirge

It could have fallen between two stools – too arty for the doom crowd and too loud for others seeking something contemplative. But it doesn’t. It reconciles the irreconcilable.

Klimt 1918 – Sentimentale Jugend

The compendium is a towering work, possibly a little overlong, but impressive none the less. And it stands easily as Klimt 1918’s best work.

Last of the Easy Riders – Last of the Easy Riders

If these six songs are anything to go on, this band will be worth keeping an eye on. In the meantime we can only dream of living in their colourful, sunny world. By Matt Butler

Geezer – Geezer

Is it worth dropping your hard earned cash on? Yes. But only if you don’t listen to the lyrics. Or they release a special prude’s edition with instrumental versions of the second and final tracks. – By Matt Butler

Year of The Cobra – In the Shadows Below

This album proves that you don’t need a guitar to play decent heavy music; there’s no mistaking that this is a great album. – By Matt Butler

Domkraft – The End of Electricity

They’re heavy, yet hypnotising. They’re loud, yet languid. They’re simple, yet psychedelic – and so, so good. – By Matt Butler

Wayfarer – Old Souls

There is a lot to take in, with four of the seven songs pushing (or exceeding) 10 minutes each, but it is still well worth a listen, especially as winter approaches. – By Matt Butler

The Well – Pagan Science

So is it essential? Probably not. But it is fun. And it reeks of a joss-stick-scented time that most of us never knew and our parents never told us about. – By Matt Butler

Téras ‎– Pandora

A very good slab of high-speed metal, played by people with an ear for a crunching breakdown or a soaring chorus, as well as barreling riffage. – By Matt Butler

Tranquonauts – Tranquonauts

Let’s face it, putting out two songs of jams, which span the entire side of a full length album and making it even listenable, let alone enjoyable, is a tall order. And they’ve pulled it off. – By Matt Butler

Nopes – Never Heard of It

This is the best punk record I’ve heard in ages. In fact, it’s bloody marvellous. – By Matt Butler

Holy Serpent – Temples

Be warned. You may not warm to this immediately, but when you do, you may find yourself shopping for stuff that hasn’t been in fashion since the first time flares were the thing. You may even feel the need for a lava lamp. Or at least a long skateboard. – By Matt Butler

Los Disidentes Del Sucio Motel – Human Collapse

Los Disidentes Del Sucio Motel created a massive, angst-ridden collection of anthemic monsters, retaining a few of their desert fried-roots, but adding baubles like a knack for a hook or clever breakdown, progressive elements and a shiny, near-radio-friendly production sheen. – By matt Butler

Yawning Man – Historical Graffiti (The Ion Studio Session)

If Yawning Man’s previous rate of output is anything to go on, this will be the last we will hear of them for a while. Savour this while you can. – By Matt Butler

Blind Pilot – And Then Like Lions

It’s a gentle call of defiance, an acceptance of grief at the end of what was a cathartic 10-song creation. It acknowledges that even if life throws over-ripe tomatoes at you, you can still make Bloody Marys. Let’s hope it’s not another five years before we hear from Blind Pilot again. By Matt Buttler

Abigail – The Final Damnation

The bottom line is this album is loads of fun, with its debauchery and Satanism turned up to cartoonish levels. – By Matt Butler

Fange – Purge

This is bloody great, if you like your music scary, abrasive and bleak. And loud of course. – By Matt Butler

Scientist – 10100II00101

It may sound churlish to complain about too many riffs or an excess of changes, because innovation in a genre which is straitened and slow to evolve should be praised. But just as speaking to a genius on a caffeine high is no doubt extremely informative and exhilarating, it would also be exasperating. – By Matt Butler

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