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By: Guido Segers

The two-song EP by Vanad Varjud from Estonia is a grim first encounter with the band. The songs last well over the 10 minutes border and envelop you in depressive darkness. The slow starting ‘Tumm Rongkäik’ (Silent Procession) features silence and the occasional drum sound in the first ten minutes. Some eerie sounds can be distinguished, but are barely audible.

When the music starts playing, first there’s the cascading guitar riff, played in such speeds to create a static wave pattern. Slow drums are being played, as in a ritual setting. Slowly the sound becomes more menacing, more grim and full of cold hate. Like a torrent, the music drags you in, slowly nodding along, one barely notices the change where a melody is sounding through the layers of guitar, until it gently comes to a close.

‘Absurdiinimene’ (Absurd Human) is the second track, which starts with the sound of an icy gale blowing. The sounds that seep through are ominous. Clean guitar tones are being played in the same minor setting as Metallica’s ‘One’. A thunderous drum sound reverberates though the air and in a flash the riffing starts. A furious roar and samples start playing in Estonian. `

The Estonian extreme metal scene is very hidden and mostly known through a few bands that have somehow captured the interest of the media, like their folk-metal outfit Metsatöll or the sludge duo Talbot. I talked to Sorts Apostata and Thon from Vanad Varjud about the underground in this far-off corner of Europe, where winters are long and cold and where faith is minimal.

(((o))): Who are Vanad Varjud and in what other bands did you play?

Sorts: Vanad Varjud is me, Sorts Apostata is the so called ‘main man’ of the band. The band was born in 2000. I was already far into other things, but this became the main project. Thon played the drums and did vocals, so the ‘main man’ started to become a bit blurrier. So far it’s my thing, but Thon is responsible for all the drum work. We both have been around in the Estonian ‘scene’ for years, though it’s hard to still call it a scene. It might be just me, there are some new winds blowing.

Thon: I have been in several metal bands over the years. For a list of all my bands and projects, you can check my Bandcamp page [there is a lot to check out. Ed]. Most of the music can also be listened to there. There is a complete list of bands I was in or connected to.

Sorts: I’ve been involved with Ignorabimus in the past. Also with the band Nihilistikrypt. The band Mass In Comatose is my brainchild, though we will have to see if it ever rises again. When it comes to the scene in Estonia, the best source to check is Estonianmetal, though it has moved more to Facebook. What is happening and where the action is can usually be found there.

(((o))): What does Vanad Varjud mean? What is the idea behind the band?

Sorts: Vanad Varjud means in English ‘Shadows of the Past’ (though there are multiple interpretations, literally Old Shadows, meaning that the night is a calm time). This is, as far as what I did goes, the crown jewel and my most important project. It is mostly mine, where I create atmosphere like I’ve never done before. It feels very natural to me to do this the way I feel like. Being free of dogmas is a theme, as in can we even do that? We move to live grabbing hold of these dogmas to give us meaning and answers. They prevent us from thinking and we obey them quite unquestioning instead of looking at ourselves and others as human beings.

The music needs to be slow. Watch a snowflake fall, watch how it rains and feel the beauty and eerie atmosphere, the timelessness… Think of the smell of old trees, the foggy moon and sunrise (don’t take this as sounding too much like hippie stuff). Whatever you believe is your way and yours alone. It is good to have some travellers with you though, maybe even to the end?



(((o))): What is the general idea/thought you are trying to convey to your listeners?

Sorts: I don’t try to convey anything really. I give something and you can take from it what you want, like I take things from other artists in the same way. It’s a matter of sharing, growing and learning and always moving forward. This is not as easy as it sounds of course, trying to be original and following your own path. We all wear certain chains, though we link up and find connections, but that is not always easy. It can even be a painful process, but through pain we might achieve even greater things and more happiness.

We obey others, we are mastering others, we enslave others and enslave ourselves. Who are these others though, what others are there and why don’t we try to master our own self first? I think that’s the hardest thing, to find meaning in all this. It’s not the most original dilemma, very Nietzschean…Take your pick: Socrates, Gailit, Tammsaare…

(((o))): Where do you draw inspiration from?

Thon: Inspiration is everywhere, in books, music, film and nature or wherever you look.

Sorts: I can’t add much to that. Maybe what is inspirational to me is that feeling of pure loneliness that we humans feel. You are born alone and you die alone and in some way you always are alone. Growing is a solitary process, but we can try to share this maybe.

(((o))): What is it like to be an Estonian black metal band. Does being Estonian have any influence on your music do you think?

Sorts: There are bands here and some projects, but no tight knit scene in the way people would imagine. We meet, greet and have a drink now and then, but not too often I guess. Metal in Estonia, especially black metal, is quite underground. Everyone is doing their own thing in their little corner and I think that’s fine the way it is.

If you consider where and how Estonians have lived historically and geographically and what the weather is like, then the music definitely is influenced by being Estonian. Then again, it might be my thing; we are very closed off people.

(((o))): I’ve listened to your 2 song EP. What can you tell about the writing and recording?

Thon: The idea of VV has been growing in Sorts for years and it first came to life after we finished recording with a metal band. Sorts and me had the studio to ourselves and started to record the dripping water from some pipe near the door. We messed around with effects and created this eerie sound that just needed some drums. We recorded those as well in some takes, and then Sorts did the guitars. We did the vocals in a second session, but the rest of it… It just happened.

Sorts: In a basement in Põlva we built a studio. There were pipes all over the place, it was underground and you could hear people flush their toilets. For recording we had to predict when people were going to do their business… You never knew what you’d find in that place before you had opened the door. There was also a radio station operating from there. It was a legendary and strange place with ice-cold winters. When it started leaking one day we put a metal tub underneath it and started recording the dripping.

Thon was doing the editing for some other band and I was freezing, reading the book ‘Maagide Kool’ by Vladimir Weidemann (translation: School of Mages: Estonian Occult Underground 1970-1980). When the band Sõjaruun was done recording Talv, the drumkit was still there, so we did this basic stuff. It was spontaneous and pure joy to make and I wish every album could be done this way. The writing was done in my head and we had the basic recording. After that I spend some time to adjust things and do the vocals.

(((o))): Is there a theme to it, do you chose specific messages for a release you make?

Sorts: It’s not like a story of any kind is integral to our music, there are themes that just follow and we pick up on what happens around us. The future material is planned to involve dark themes. It seriously will be very dark.



(((o))): What are the samples from that are in the songs? Why did you choose them?

Sorts: The ambient elements there are mostly recorded and modified by us. We chose those to create a kind of eerie atmosphere, like a church/monastery atmosphere. These are things we just did, you know? It was very inspiring stuff to use and create. It was a cold November when this came from my mind, before I turned it into flesh.
(((o))): The EP is out on Hexenreich Records. How did you get on this label and why did you chose for tape as a carrier?

Thon: I have known Volly [boss of Hexenreich] for many years. I talk to him almost every week, so it was quite a natural thing to happen.

Sorts: Yeah, Thon did the talking on that one. I’ve known the same person for many years, but Thon was more on a business level with this I suppose. Hexenreich has been functioning as a label dealing with this music for a long time now and it’s not like there are that many places for our kind of music. He’s a good person to work with.

Actually we released a sort of split with Hexenreich and Eerie Moonlit Trees, which is a label I started to create an underground label. I have to see if that’s going to work out. Choosing the cassette format is partly because it is simply very cheap. I would like to release material on CD, LP and MCD, but as long as we don’t have that kind of deal, we will work with what we have. Anyone who is interested in helping us forward is most welcome.

(((o))): Can you tell us a bit about metal in Estonia and mainly extreme metal?

Sorts: I don’t know that much of the new Estonian metal scene. There is stuff going on and if someone is interested in it, the best news source is, though it doesn’t offer the most recent news right now. We’re simply outside of it I guess.

Some fresh things that are going on as far as I know, Ingmar Aasoja from Thou Shell Of Death has some interesting things going on. The bands Urt and Aghor are active and interesting, Tharaphita has some nice progress and Süngehel has new stuff going on that are worth checking gout. Goresoerd you can look up on Facebook, which is definitely a cool band.

I’ve got a list of records that are, in my opinion worth checking out, which offer a good impression of the Estonian scene. My opinion also varies of course; it depends on what I feel like.

Sõjaruun – Talv (2010)
Mortified – Wilderness (1993)
Tharaphita – All pool Lund Ja Jääd (1997)
Aggressor – Legal Requirement (1993)
Nihilistikrypt – I hate everything (2006)
Skydancer – The Dawnhunter (1996)

(((o))): Why do you think Estonia is the most atheistic country in Europe?

Thon: I think it’s a good thing, it seems a natural fact to me really. Studies have indeed shown it’s the most non-religious country in the world and it feels like a good thing.

Sorts: There are all sorts of studies, so I don’t agree with Thon on this. Right, in reality we may not be on level with the classic religious countries, but we’ve been fucked by religion enough as a small nation. Religion in my opinion is like slavery in the classic way. We are officially a Lutheran country in so far, but there is no official religion in our country. There are big churches and such, with big budgets, but where does that money come from? We live and believe in a more Protestant way I think, more sober. I don’t believe a God that promises good things for those that serve is a good thing; it’s mental slavery, being fooled by these promises that tell us we are blessed if we obey. What bothers me most is why we behave like believers still, even when we claim not to believe.

Fun fact, the Lutheran church wishes to build a skyscraper in Tallinn, which will be the biggest building in the city. What should we think of that?

(((o))): Anything else you’d like to share?

Sorts: Bottle of cheap whiskey and two dark beers? Thanks for this opportunity and everyone, support bands that you enjoy and perhaps we’ll meet some day.

While answering these questions, I was listening to some old material and some weird stuff came to my ears. It feels like a great journey to answer this and get back into listening to old material.

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